Pennsylvania Family Law and Divorce
Lisa Marie Vari & Associates, P.C.

September 2012 Archives

Parental Alienation Syndrome - A Relationship Problem, Not a Mental Disorder

Our Allegheny County Custody Lawyers bring you the latest child custody news:

Active Military in Allegheny County: Today We Honor You

In remembrance of 9/11, our Pittsburgh family law attorneys at Lisa Marie Vari & Associates salute our active military personnel serving and protecting our country each and every day. These brave men and women deserve our utmost respect not just today, but each day for the service they provide for our country.

"Celebrities ...They're Just Like Us!" - Pittsburgh Divorce Lawyers

Our Pittsburgh Family Lawyers have experience with handling both high-profile and everyday divorces. As our office has learned, the Hollywood lifestyle may differ quite a bit from our reality, but getting divorced is a common experience shared celebrities and non-celebrities alike. Unfortunately, divorce does not discriminate and like any breakup, a celebrity divorce can either be handled in a civil manner or devolve into a destructive mess. Although celebrities face the added struggle of keeping their divorce drama away from the prying eyes of the media, keeping the pain private and civil is good practice for any divorce. The media may not like it, but low conflict - and a low profile - is what's best, especially for children.

Report of the Juvenile Court Procedural Rules Committee

A recent explanatory report released by the Juvenile Court Procedural Rules Committee of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court addresses the role of a guardian ad litem in a juvenile proceeding. Although many have heard the term "guardian ad litem," few understand the difficult position these attorneys are in and what their role is in a juvenile court proceeding. The most important aspect of this unique attorney-client relationship is based on trust. The child must trust his or her attorney and feel as though their attorney is looking out for their interests. However, the report from the Juvenile Court Procedural Rules Committee implies that more often than not, this relationship is one of betrayal and distrust in the child's eyes.