Pennsylvania Family Law and Divorce
Lisa Marie Vari & Associates, P.C.

Posts tagged "Divorce in Pennsylvania"

Pennsylvania Fault-Based Divorce Amendment

Pennsylvania law permits parties to a divorce action to proceed as a no fault-based or fault-based divorce. No fault divorce means that you file and assert the "irretrievable breakdown" of the marriage, meaning that the marriage is broken beyond repair. In this type of divorce, neither party has to prove fault. Fault-based divorce means that you have to prove one of fault grounds to have the divorce be allowed to proceed. The fault-based divorce grounds include adultery, abandonment, cruelty, bigamy, conviction with imprisonment for over two years, and actions that make the marriage intolerable.

Collaborative Divorce: The Alternative to a Traditional Divorce

Though its been used for some time in several states, the process of collaborative divorce is a pretty new concept when it comes to Pennsylvania family law. The process is intended to be more cooperative and usually less-stressful way of getting a divorce. Because divorce can often be a very tough time for those involved, this alternative to taking your case to court can alleviate some of the stress and worry associated with divorce. Collaborative divorce is a process where both spouses work together to achieve the result best for their own situation. Read more to find some information on collaborative divorce in Pennsylvania.

Divorce and Life Insurance

Generally, one spouse will often list the other spouse as the beneficiary on a insurance policy. Life insurance is often a forgotten asset in many divorce claims. As such, there are several issues that arise during a divorce where a life insurance policy is involved.

Helping Children Deal with the Emotional Impact of Divorce

Divorce and separation are very difficult for all parties involved. Children who have parents going through a divorce are commonly faced with confusion, conflict, and anxiety. Helping children deal with this emotional stress can be difficult and often require family counseling and independent counseling for the child. But what happens when a parent wants to help their child deal with these issues at home, but doesn't know how to approach the subject? Companies like Zipland Interactive Ltd., have worked to solve this problem. 

Pet Custody in Pennsylvania

There are many considerations when going through a separation or a divorce. Matters of equitable distribution and child custody are typically at the forefront, but where do family pets fall into the mix? In Pennsylvania, pets are considered personal property. This means that when dividing assets, pets are legally viewed in the same light as a family car or home. This presents a unique conflict as most Americans consider their family pet as part of the family, rather than a possession of the family.